Jump to content
Hayek's plosive

Banque centrales, grosses bêtises & propagande

Recommended Posts

Dans la catégorie enfumage, je voudrais la MMT:

 

Citation

Some Key Ideas Behind MMT, the Theory Everyone’s Talking About
2019-03-05 15:32:12.561 GMT


By Matthew Boesler
(Bloomberg) -- It’s becoming hard to avoid. Everyone from Nobel laureate Paul Krugman to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been compelled recently to weigh in on Modern Monetary Theory, an alternative approach to economics at odds with the principles that have guided most Western policy makers for decades.
Interest in the theory is exploding in tandem with the U.S. budget deficit, after President Donald Trump’s tax cuts for top earners and businesses. Instead of promising to repair America’s public finances, many 2020 challengers on the Democratic side are running on big programs like the Green New Deal and Medicare For All that could further widen the gap between government spending and revenues.
MMT’s ideas about government finance and the space for fiscal spending offer a route to achieve those goals, and politicians such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Sanders are catching on. Economists including Krugman and Lawrence Summers as well as policy makers like Powell are pushing back.
(You’re reading Bloomberg’s weekly economic research roundup.)
The debate in the U.S. right now centers on the question of whether there’s room for more public spending, with the MMTers arguing that governments -- misled by conventional economic  thinking -- have become too fiscally conservative. The work of leading MMT scholars, published in academic journals since the 1990s, shows some of the roots of that argument. It also reveals the school’s vision of a dramatic departure from the way economic policy works now, especially in key areas like managing employment and inflation.
Here are some of the most important papers that offer insight into what MMT is all about: Modern Money (Wray, 1998)
MMT’s policy prescriptions largely stem from the idea that money’s value is derived from the fact that it’s needed in order  to pay taxes. If a government can tax citizens, it creates  demand for whatever currency the obligation is paid in. That allows a government to print its own money and  urchase goods
and services from households and companies -- knowing the sellers will have a reason to accept it. In other words, the government spends money into the economy first and then taxes some of it back later, instead of the other way around. L. Randall Wray’s paper draws on the writings of 20th-
century economists Friedrich Knapp and John Maynard Keynes to illustrate the historical roots of the theory. He connects it to the work of Abba Lerner, a Russian-born U.K. economist of the mid-20th century. Lerner’s doctrine of “functional finance” argued that governments should pursue their real-economy goals and treat the resulting budget balance as a residual outcome -- instead of subordinating those goals to the quest for a balanced budget. (Many MMTers argue that President Donald Trump is currently doing something very similar.) 
The Natural Rate of Interest Is Zero (Forstater and Mosler, 2005)
Central bankers around the world are obsessed with estimating the so-called natural rate of interest, which in mainstream economic theory serves to bring the desired levels of savings and investment into balance. The rate is now held by mainstream economists to be largely a function of  demographics
and productivity, and Fed officials believe that for the U.S. it’s currently somewhere between 2.5 percent and 3.5 percent. Mathew Forstater and Warren Mosler use MMT’s idea about the source of money’s value to argue that the concept of a natural rate hasn’t been relevant in major economies since they moved to a floating exchange-rate system in the 1970s. The “natural” or “normal” rate is now zero, in the sense that central bankers have to take specific actions to prevent it from settling there, and keeping it above zero is “necessarily a political decision” on their part.
Public Service Employment: A Path to Full Employment (Wray, Dantas, Fullwiler, Tcherneva and Kelton, 2018) 
MMT economists have long supported a jobs guarantee. They draw inspiration from American economist Hyman Minsky, who said the government can serve as the employer of last resort, and from the public works programs of the New Deal. The MMT argument is that the jobs guarantee isn’t just a welfare measure: It’s also a key stabilizer of the economy, which will set a floor on wages and shore up demand during recessions. They argue that it’s better to use employment as a buffer than unemployment -- their description of the current approach, in which the Fed sets interest rates based on the idea that if the jobless rate gets too low then the result will be high inflation.
Even if the government paid 15 million people to participate in such a work program, “the impact on inflation would be macroeconomically insignificant,” the economists estimated in this 2018 study. 

To contact the reporter on this story: Matthew Boesler in New York at mboesler1@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net
Ben Holland, Jeff Kearns

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'ai toujours cru que la MMT, c'était 3 mecs dans leur cave avec encore moins de visibilité académique que les Autrichiens. Mais en fait, même Krugman écrit des articles sur eux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'en ai pas mal entendu parler ces trois derniers mois 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'ai même entendu un économiste par terre en faire du name dropping sur plateau télé. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C’est des choses qui arrivent quand on a la TV. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 19 heures, NoName a dit :

J'en ai pas mal entendu parler ces trois derniers mois 

 

J'ai cru comprendre que c'était la dinde AOC qui en avait parlé.

 

Bon, sinon, tldr, c'est un repackaging du keynesianisme vulgaire, non ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

En fait y a tout un mouvement qui commence à dire que Deficits dont matter, et ça ne vient pas seulement d'AOC désolé pour les obsédés.

Déjà la majorité du GOP a supprimé toute référence aux déficits et à la dette depuis que le président US n'est plus un noir, alors même que certains avaient fait leur carrière là-dessus.

Et ensuite des gens pas franchement socialos comme Warren Buffett, ou le mec de Pimco commence à défendre cette idée.

Je pense que ça mérite un topic séparé.

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-07/mmt-moment-pimco-veteran-mcculley-says-it-deserves-a-hearing

 

https://www.axios.com/warren-buffett-national-debt-6fa22c24-bc40-4cda-8895-973605ea465a.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 14 minutes, Fagotto a dit :

pas franchement socialos comme Warren Buffett

... Le crony cap d'entre les crony caps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 9:04 PM, Hayek's plosive said:

Dans la catégorie enfumage, je voudrais la MMT:

 

 

 

C'est un nouvel avatar, sous un nouveau package, de la politique de la planche à billets.

 

Dans la mesure ou les dettes publiques des US ne sont plus remboursables en dollars forts sans mesures extremes (en gros, confiscation des richesses voire même reduction des dépenses publiques), faire tourner la planche à billets est une option qui peut faire sens.

 

Une monnaie saine et forte, gérée par une banque Centrale Indépendante, est profitable à l'économie sous reserve que le deficit public soit maîtrisé. Lorsque ce n'est pas le cas, s'accrocher à une monnaie forte peut être suicidaire (cf l'Argentine en 2000 ou la Grèce en 2015). C'est d'ailleurs pour ça que l'Euro-deutschmark profite à l'Allemagne et pas à l'Italie.

 

 

Ceci dit, la politique de MMT a été appliquée récemment avec enthousiasme par le Zimbabwe, il est dommage que les admirateurs de la MMT ne citent pas Mugabe dans leur références.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 55 minutes, Fagotto a dit :

En fait y a tout un mouvement qui commence à dire que Deficits dont matter, et ça ne vient pas seulement d'AOC désolé pour les obsédés.

 

On parle de la MMT, pas de l'ensemble des théories économiques qui justifient la dette, mais bien d'une théorie particulière. C'est AOC qui a ramené ça sur le tapis dans le débat américain à ma connaissance. On le dit même dans le NYT :

 

Citation
  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the charismatic new congresswoman who has shown an uncanny ability to drive public policy debates, indicated openness to “modern monetary theory,” the idea that public spending need not be constrained by tax revenues.

 https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/23/upshot/how-america-learned-to-stop-worrying-and-love-deficits-and-debt.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

L'article montre bien qu'il y a un contexte global à cette résurgence du MMT, et que ça vient pas seulement de la gauche, mais de l'abandon général du "souci de la dette" dans la politique US mainstream, et en particulier dans le GOP dès qu'il arrive au pouvoir.

Et AOC a du reprendre le truc d'une économiste de Sanders.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nan mais le contexte global de chercher des justifications pour ne pas équilibrer son budget c’est un contexte global depuis 30 ans sauf en Allemagne hein :D.

 

Ca va du yakafaukon (tax cut will pay for themselves) à l’exhumation de thèses universitaires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Si ça intéresse quelqu'un ici, il manque un bon article sur la MMT dans Contrepoints (et Wikibéral) et il y a sans doute beaucoup de lecteurs qui en entendent parler positivement sans avoir d'explications claires. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'ai deux questions très bêtes (je veux juste être sûr) que je ne sais pas très bien où poser :

 

Comment se fait-il que l'Etat emprunte à des taux extrêmement bas, voir négatif ?

 

A qui les banques centrales donnent-elles l'argent supplémentaire qu'elles créent ? Je crois savoir qu'elles n'ont pas le droit de racheter directement la dette publique, j'imagine qu'elles le font d'une manière détournée, mais je n'ai pas très bien compris comment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La BCE achètent de la dette publique sur le marché secondaire et des obligations de grandes entreprises. 

Les règles prudentielles obligent les banques et les assurances à se gorger de dette publique. Ça leur coûte moins cher de payer pour prêter que les éventuelles amendes et autres punitions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 2 heures, Tramp a dit :

La BCE achètent de la dette publique sur le marché secondaire et des obligations de grandes entreprises. 

Les règles prudentielles obligent les banques et les assurances à se gorger de dette publique. Ça leur coûte moins cher de payer pour prêter que les éventuelles amendes et autres punitions. 

Tout à fait. Quand la réglementation te permet de conserver exactement 0 fonds propres pour toute quantité d'obligations publiques "suffisamment bonnes", alors que à peu près tout autre investissement te coûte des fonds propres, et bien tu te gorges de dette française.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Merci !

 

Du coup, les banques centrales, d'un coté, agressent les banques secondaires en les contraignants à acheter des mauvais produits financiers (des dettes à taux ridicules), et d'un autre coté, les avantagent en rachetant lesdits produits avec de la nouvelle monnaie ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toujours plus d’economie administrée :

 

Revamped Euribor, Eonia set to win regulatory approval by year-end https://reut.rs/2Y9ULAp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...