Jump to content
Librekom

Petits problèmes de math

Recommended Posts

Je suis piégé dans une boucle infinie : je suis choqué que log(ab) ≠ b log(a) si a < 0 (ou complexe). Puis j’oublie une semaine après. Puis je me fait avoir à nouveau 3 mois après. Merci pour la piqûre de rappel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Source : Quanta’s Science and Math Crossword Puzzle & fichier PDF

Screenshot-from-2019-01-10-12-05-29.png

Citation

ACROSS

 

1. 15 families of this can fill any plane, but it doesn’t fully fit here. Just sayin’ (10, 5’) (Wolchover)
11. Frontless garb becomes a drug to reduce blood pressure (3)
12. Your brain connectome remains recognizable regardless of this, apparently (3) (McElvery)
13. Quantum correlations can do this to the arrow of time. It’s about poetry! (7) (Moskvitch)
15. Multicolored brain map evokes a chopped desk with water (7) (Brouillette)
17. Curare might miss the tail, but not a pair of legs, anatomically (5)
18. 8 years in grad school solving quantum problem. Is she grim alum? No. Gee! (6,1) (Klarreich)
21. Major league baseball fan knows the game is finished (2,5/3,4)
24. That man, oaf that he is, holds an endangered ox (4)
26. Seeing data in new ways won award in field with Freudian obstinacy and yes, spasms (9) (Ouellette)
29. Assuming a curled-up state but losing position may help cells heal wounds (5) (Cepelewicz)
31. Boys bathroom that bars Bo? Fashion label says “No, no!” (2/3, 3/2)
33. A shadow on a wall lets you see around corners. It’s Canonically everything! (5) (Wolchover)
36. Math theory for visual  hallucinations might inspire this cheer for Timothy Leary (2,3,4) (Ouellette)
39. Toot in proper sequence to summon up a real band or a fictional dog (4)
40. We need a drink — mixed, not wine — for this genius of physics (6,1)
44. To be a Quanta writer, first name a Middle East country and end with a high grade (7)
46. Not oldest fossils but squished rocks, it seems — when cut with his sharp blade (5) (Lambert)
47. Octonion sounding like a line consumed from a manufacturing catalog (#1,4,2) (Honner)
50. Machine smooths same phase transition that caused water’s cosmic origin? (7) (Wolchover)
53. Smart glasses that reveal French scene? (3)
54. The holy grail of the player who plays the percentage game (#3)
55. Sculpture item Google maps must have to give both location and the altitude (#1,11,3)

 

Citation

DOWN

 

1. Orderings to watch six episodes every way don’t need this last number per Houston (12,#3) (Klarreich)
2. Upturned vehicle with Canadian rapper? (3)
3. French-sounding three, then written as Roman six — it’s a fountain of possibilities (5)
4. Almost short form of short form, it tells you how fast you stream (3)
5. There’s nothing in there above the fog — just too much humidity (9)
6. Not the first mantra for cavities (5)
7. Droplet from pill lands you in a flap (3)
8. Ice dwelling sophisticated enough to include an English-style bathroom (5)
9. Like Russell’s paradox, if you get wind of this answer, you don’t get any wind (3)
10. Impartial genetic change can polarize evolutionists — to adapt or not is the question (7,8) (Callier)
14. Tin in a pig’s dwelling is insufficient (6)
16. Indian mulberry that a Hebrew lord consumes? (3)
19. Deprive a Polynesian princess of metal and she’s an extinct bird (3)
20. Leary’s odd to put it down (3)
22. Life without an end can inhibit cell growth (3)
23. Critically examine the animal doctor? (3)
25. In broken octal, it’s a solid lump (1,4)
27. Repeat this — it’s a plot! (3)
28. Famous cup pattern, followed by the bonus its designer, Gina Ekiss, was paid (4,4,#1)
30. Insulin levels can change an ant’s reaction to this (3) (Cepelewicz)   
32. They do influence rainfall but no single leaf pore can cause a bone tumor (6) (Popkin)
34. A World War initially can provoke an exclamation of cuteness (3)
35. Alter this, and you’re a different person (3)
37. Up the bar, dung beetle! (3)
38. New World lizard infects a U.S. state no end (3)
41. Rhythmic hum squeezed through a thousand times (5)
42. Even unborns give this negative prefix (3)
43. The Colorado Index of Complex Networks is one, but we need more of them for thumbnails (5) (Klarreich)
45. Sounds like a devilish competitor of COBOL (5)
48. Harvard astrophysicist, in a vital contribution, explained black hole flares (3) (Sokol)
49. This shirt is there, oddly, for the winning this time (3)
51. Aim upward and disappear (3)
52. Exclamation recognizing mistake can be truncated by object-oriented programming (3)

 

Citation

Additional numeric clue:

 

1D – (47A)(54A) – (1A) × (18A – 55A) + 47A – 55A – 55A = 0

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soit f la fonction des entiers dans les entiers telle que f(x)=1 s'il y a une séquence de x chiffres '5' consécutifs sans '5' à gauche ni à droite dans le développement décimal de Pi, et 0 sinon. 

 

Soit g la fonction des entiers dans les entiers telle que g(x)=1 s'il y a au moins x chiffres '5' consécutifs dans le développement décimal de Pi, et 0 sinon. 

 

f est elle calculable ? g est elle calculable ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Kassad Je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir compris, enfin je me lance puisque personne d'autre ne le fait.

 

Pour la fonction g, ne serait-il pas plus simple de démontrer l'universalité de π ? Dans ce cas g renverrait toujours 1. Cela dit, dans le cas contraire on pourrait aussi calculer la plus grande séquence de '5' consécutifs au-delà de laquelle g renverrait 0. Donc, je dirais que g est calculable.

 

Concernant f, la première occurrence de 5 est en quatrième position (la deuxième arrive en huitième position) donc il existe toujours quel que soit x un '5' à gauche ou à droite dans le développement de π et f renvoie toujours 0.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 5:54 PM, Sloonz said:

Je suis piégé dans une boucle infinie : je suis choqué que log(ab) ≠ b log(a) si a < 0 (ou complexe). Puis j’oublie une semaine après. Puis je me fait avoir à nouveau 3 mois après. Merci pour la piqûre de rappel.

 

Moi aussi ça me choque. Tu as un exemple ou l'égalité est fausse ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Freezbee said:

@Kassad Je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir compris, enfin je me lance puisque personne d'autre ne le fait.

 

Pour la fonction g, ne serait-il pas plus simple de démontrer l'universalité de π ? Dans ce cas g renverrait toujours 1. Cela dit, dans le cas contraire on pourrait aussi calculer la plus grande séquence de '5' consécutifs au-delà de laquelle g renverrait 0. Donc, je dirais que g est calculable.

 

Concernant f, la première occurrence de 5 est en quatrième position (la deuxième arrive en huitième position) donc il existe toujours quel que soit x un '5' à gauche ou à droite dans le développement de π et f renvoie toujours 0.

Pour f on n'a pas de réponse mathématiques sur le fait que f soit calculable ou pas. La question était sur les 5 juste à gauche et à droite d'un paquet de 5. Par exemple f(27)=1 ssi dans le développement décimal de Pi il y a une sous séquence de 27 chiffres '5' exactement. Personne ne sait si c'est vrai ou faux (personne n'a pu démontrer que Pi est ou n'est pas un nombre univers).

 

Pour g : elle est calculable car :

  • Soit il existe k qui est la taille de la plus longue sous séquence de 5 consécutifs dans le développement de pi alors g(x) = if (x<=k) then 1 else 0.
  • Soit il n'existe pas de limite supérieure à la plus longue sous séquence de 5 alors g(x)=1 pour tout x.

bref soit c'est une fonction constante soit c'est juste une comparaison entre deux entiers qui sont deux fonctions calculables.

 

Donc g est calculable...mais personne ne sait la calculer :)

 

Au passage ça donne une nouvelle catégorie épistémique pour @Mégille... c'est une vérité scientifique qui n'est pas falsifiable sans pour autant qu'on sache laquelle des solutions est vrai. Je veux dire que j'ai une preuve que g est calculable alors que je suis incapable de donner la fonction g. C'est une preuve semi constructive (car je donne les possibilités pour g) mais pas constructive jusqu'au bout (elle repose sur le tiers exclu).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Kassad said:

Au passage ça donne une nouvelle catégorie épistémique pour @Mégille... c'est une vérité scientifique qui n'est pas falsifiable sans pour autant qu'on sache laquelle des solutions est vrai. Je veux dire que j'ai une preuve que g est calculable alors que je suis incapable de donner la fonction g. 

 

Ca me fait penser à la demonstration de " Il existe des nombres irrationnels et , tels que est un nombre rationnel " qui fonctionne sans dire quel est le coupe (a,b) solution.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principe_du_tiers_exclu#Un_deuxième_exemple

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Solomos said:

 

Ca me fait penser à la demonstration de " Il existe des nombres irrationnels a{\displaystyle a}a et b{\displaystyle b}b, tels que ab{\displaystyle a^{b}}a^{b} est un nombre rationnel " qui fonctionne sans dire quel est le coupe (a,b) solution. 

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principe_du_tiers_exclu#Un_deuxième_exemple

 

Oui c'est l'idée sauf que là on est un poil plus constructif car on connait les possibilités exactes pour g alors que pour la démo sur a et b on ne sait pas lesquels ils sont.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Solomos said:

Moi aussi ça me choque. Tu as un exemple ou l'égalité est fausse ?

log((-1)2) = log(12) = log(1) = 0

2 * log(-1) = 2 * i * pi

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Sloonz said:

log((-1)2) = log(12) = log(1) = 0

2 * log(-1) = 2 * i * pi

 

 

Ah oui, j'avais mal compris et je pensais à b<0, my bad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 16 heures, Kassad a dit :

Au passage ça donne une nouvelle catégorie épistémique pour @Mégille... c'est une vérité scientifique qui n'est pas falsifiable sans pour autant qu'on sache laquelle des solutions est vrai. Je veux dire que j'ai une preuve que g est calculable alors que je suis incapable de donner la fonction g. C'est une preuve semi constructive (car je donne les possibilités pour g) mais pas constructive jusqu'au bout (elle repose sur le tiers exclu).

 

J'ai eu un prof de logique intuitionniste pour qui ce genre de choses sont des aberrations... Mais quand à moi, il y a un petit moment déjà que j'ai accepté Kurt Gödel dans mon coeur, et que je suis platonicien en math. #AllFunctionsAreBeautiful

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dp-VXVRMU8-AANb-Vn.jpg

 

Combien de trous ce mug possède-t-il ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 6 minutes, Freezbee a dit :

Dp-VXVRMU8-AANb-Vn.jpg

 

Combien de trous ce mug possède-t-il ?

 

Je dirais trois. Le mug normal est homeomorphe à un tore donc il en a un. Si le haut du mug était fermé (si le « donut » fantaisie était entier), il y en aurait deux, ce serait en fait un double tore (la poignée et le donuts fusionnés). Là il faut ajouter aussi cette ouverture sur le dessus.

 

Je ne sais pas si le fait que le donut fantaisie soit creux compte... je crois pas ? Ou alors il y a subtilité.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ou alors il y a subtilité sur le pourtour du haut du mug. Si ce n’est pas un trou - comme pour le tore normal homéomorphe au mug, remarque, alors il y en a peut être seulement  deux... arf ma topologie est rouillée. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non c’est bien trois. Pour que l’argument précédent marche il faudrait faire remonter le fond, mais cette transformation ferait croiser le trou du donut fantaisie et ça c’est pas continu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 1 minute, Anton_K a dit :

Je dirais trois.

 

C'est ce que je pense aussi, et James Grine est d'accord (j'ai trouvé ça sur son compte Twitter).

 

@Bisounours

 

Screenshot-from-2019-01-18-15-01-04.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ce qui est marrant c’est que dans ce cas, ajouter un trou semble en créer un deuxième, le haut du mug de base devenant aussi un trou ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Faut calculer le groupe  d'homologie du truc : combien on peut mettre de lacets différents sur la structure :) Ici tout dépend si la hanse est creuse ou pas (il manque une photo pour le déterminer).

 

Il y a de jolies applications en informatique pour assurer des propriétés de résistance des réseaux de capteurs sans savoir où exactement sont les capteurs (COVERAGE AND HOLE-DETECTION IN SENSOR NETWORKS VIA HOMOLOGY).

 

Et je me suis toujours dit qu'on pourrait appliquer à la gestion automatique de tests (pour assurer des propriétés de couverture) mais j'ai jamais eu le courage de m'y pencher sérieusement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 24 minutes, Bisounours a dit :

On compte pour deux les extrémités de l'espèce de tunnnel transversal  ?

 

Dp-VXVRMU8-AANb-Vn2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Une tribune en faveur de l'enseignement des maths discrètes :)

 

Citation

Why Discrete Math Is Important

by David Patrick
 

Most middle and high school math curricula follow a well-defined path:

 

Pre-algebra → Algebra 1 → Geometry → Algebra 2 → Trig / Precalculus → Calculus

 

Other middle and high schools prefer an "integrated" curriculum, wherein elements of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry are mixed together over a 3-year or 4-year sequence. However, both of these approaches generally lack a great deal of emphasis on discrete math: topics such as combinatorics, probability, number theory, set theory, logic, algorithms, and graph theory. Because discrete math does not figure prominently in most states' middle or high school "high-stakes" progress exams, and because it also does not figure prominently on college-admissions exams such as the SAT, it is often overlooked.

However, discrete math has become increasingly important in recent years, for a number of reasons:

Discrete math is essential to college-level mathematics and beyond.

Discrete math—together with calculus and abstract algebra—is one of the core components of mathematics at the undergraduate level. Students who learn a significant quantity of discrete math before entering college will be at a significant advantage when taking undergraduate-level math courses.

Discrete math is the mathematics of computing.

The mathematics of modern computer science is built almost entirely on discrete math, in particular combinatorics and graph theory. This means that in order to learn the fundamental algorithms used by computer programmers, students will need a solid background in these subjects. Indeed, at most universities, a undergraduate-level course in discrete mathematics is a required part of pursuing a computer science degree.

Discrete math is very much "real world" mathematics.

Many students' complaints about traditional high school math—algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and the like—is "What is this good for?" The somewhat abstract nature of these subjects often turn off students. By contrast, discrete math, in particular counting and probability, allows students—even at the middle school level—to very quickly explore non-trivial "real world" problems that are challenging and interesting.

Discrete math shows up on most middle and high school math contests.

Prominent math competitions such as MATHCOUNTS (at the middle school level) and the American Mathematics Competitions (at the high school level) feature discrete math questions as a significant portion of their contests. On harder high school contests, such as the AIME, the quantity of discrete math is even larger. Students that do not have a discrete math background will be at a significant disadvantage in these contests. In fact, one prominent MATHCOUNTS coach tells us that he spends nearly 50% of his preparation time with his students covering counting and probability topics, because of their importance in MATHCOUNTS contests.

Discrete math teaches mathematical reasoning and proof techniques.

Algebra is often taught as a series of formulas and algorithms for students to memorize (for example, the quadratic formula, solving systems of linear equations by substitution, etc.), and geometry is often taught as a series of "definition-theorem-proof" exercises that are often done by rote (for example, the infamous "two-column proof"). While undoubtedly the subject matter being taught is important, the material (as least at the introductory level) does not lend itself to a great deal of creative mathematical thinking. By contrast, with discrete mathematics, students will be thinking flexibly and creatively right out of the box. There are relatively few formulas to memorize; rather, there are a number of fundamental concepts to be mastered and applied in many different ways.

Discrete math is fun.

Many students, especially bright and motivated students, find algebra, geometry, and even calculus dull and uninspiring. Rarely is this the case with most discrete math topics. When we ask students what their favorite topic is, most respond either "combinatorics" or "number theory." (When we ask them what their least favorite topic is, the overwhelming response is "geometry.") Simply put, most students find discrete math more fun than algebra or geometry.

We strongly recommend that, before students proceed beyond geometry, they invest some time learning elementary discrete math, in particular counting & probability and number theory. Students can start studying discrete math - for example, our books Introduction to Counting & Probability and Introduction to Number Theory - with very little algebra background.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Freezbee

Aaaaaaaaargh j'avais pas compté l'anse ! C'est toi qui a fait les flèches rouges pour débile ? :icon_tourne:

Donc autrement, le tunnel compte pour un.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 12 minutes, Bisounours a dit :

C'est toi qui a fait les flèches rouges pour débile ?

 

Oui, j'ai fait ça tout seul. Tiens, je t'ai fait un autre dessin parce que je t'aime bien ;)

 

Tuxpaint.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a une heure, Kassad a dit :

 Ici tout dépend si la hanse est creuse ou pas (il manque une photo pour le déterminer).

C'est la première question que je me suis posé (et pourtant, je ne suis pas vraiment fan de topologie). ;)

 

il y a 29 minutes, Freezbee a dit :

Une tribune en faveur de l'enseignement des maths discrètes :)

Une excellente initiative. Quand on dit "faut être bon en maths pour être bon en info", c'est une affirmation qui est trop floue pour être utile. Il est globalement inutile d'être bon en maths continues (à part certains détails, comme les diverses théories des approximants, qui sont en fait les parties "sales", "impures" des maths continues), mais c'est très utile d'être bon en maths discrètes. Et c'est là qu'on remarque tout l'écart entre l'enseignement des maths dans le supérieur en France ou aux USA : la France fait de l'analyse et de la topologie des disciplines reines, alors qu'outre-Atlantique, la théorie des graphes, la théorie des jeux et évidemment l'info théorique sont davantage valorisées.

 

Pour caricaturer, Villani s'occupe d'équations aux dérivées partielles, de variétés diférentielles ; Conway étudie les automates cellulaires et classe les polyhèdres, des activités que beaucoup de mathématiciens "classiques" en France auraient considéré comme des récréations indignes d'être publiées entre deux sessions de maths sérieuses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour ma pomme, c'est en partie par les maths continues,

et les innombrables algorithmes de calcul approché de racines (sur calculatrice TI au lycée)

que je suis arrivé en informatique.

De là, en passant eg par les fractales, je trouve qu'on rejoint les automates cellulaires assez naturellement.

 

De toutes manières, le continu, sur ordinateur, il est forcément discret.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Rübezahl said:

De toutes manières, le continu, sur ordinateur, il est forcément discret. 

  

 

T'inquiète pas, pour les matheux aussi...

 

Soient ils font un gros paquet de réels, genre [0;1[, soit ils parlent d'un réel en particulier. Mais pour en parler ils écrivent un joli texte...qui n'est rien d'autre qu'un entier.

 

Et oui l'ensemble des réels dont on peut parler individuellement est un ensemble de mesure nulle dans R.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ω est un nombre réel vérifiant ω + π/2 = 3 et ω - π/2 = ε.

Combien vaut ω + π ?

 

Révélation

Réponse : m

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 14 heures, Freezbee a dit :

ω est un nombre réel vérifiant ω + π/2 = 3 et ω - π/2 = ε.

Combien vaut ω + π ?

 

  Révéler le contenu masqué

Réponse : m

 

 

Révélation

ω + π = m = (9 - ε)/2

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...